This Quilter Eats Pumpkin Pie for Breakfast! Plus…my recipe.

On Friday I prepared a homemade pie crust. I’m neither the best nor worst crust maker. Truthfully, I could use more practice making pie crusts. But I’m afraid. You see, I love pie so much that if I practiced more that means I’d be baking more pies. And eating more of them. Probably for breakfast! Once in a while is fine, but at 55 years old, my metabolism isn’t what it once was and I’d like to not have to buy or sew a whole larger size wardrobe due to an out of control pie habit.

OK. Sew. Don’t judge.

This was the last piece. And it was DEEEEEElicious! Plus, pumpkin pie has way more nutrition than most commercial cereals! And technically, this isn’t even “pumpkin”. It’s an heirloom Spanish Squash called Buen Gusto de Horno which means, “good taste from the oven”. I just couldn’t help myself when I saw the gorgeous warty green “pumpkin” picture in the seed catalog listing, but I digress.

So…squash pie. This breakfast is actually pretty darn healthy, don’t you think? You knew all pumpkins are squash but not all squash are pumpkins, right?

I planted just a couple of this variety in my garden this year. Squirrels took one of the plants, but I still managed to get a few 7+ pound beautiful warty fruits from the remaining plant before the early freeze and snow came.

Buen Gusto de Horno Squash

Baker Creek (the seed company from which I purchased my seeds) says this in their description of this pumpkin…er…I mean, squash, “The dense, firm, medium yellow-orange flesh is sweet and fine-grained, and definitely excellent for baking. Add excellent keeping quality, and you’ve got a real winner that everyone is sure to love!

Here’s what it looks like when it’s cut open and the seeds have been scraped:

Now, maybe you’re thinking the inside flesh and thin green rind reminds you a little bit of cantaloupe? Well, I was surprised to discover it also smelled very sweet and quite a lot like cantaloupe. I wondered how this was going to work out for making a pie, but I charged ahead using the roasting and pureeing techniques I used for my New England Sugar Pie Pumpkins.

I was surprised again when I pulled the roasted squash out of the oven and the flesh had turned the most gorgeous deep gold. And the most heavenly, rich pumpkin aroma (no more cantaloupe smell).

OK…on to my recipe. This recipe is inspired by the one I used for YEARS (it came from the back of the can of a famous brand of commercially canned pumpkin). Yes, I did change it up. I don’t like my pumpkin pie too sweet so I cut the sugar a little bit. I also don’t care for quite so much ground cloves. I feel cloves are very strong and overtake the delicious pumpkin flavor; so, I use about 1/2 as much as the original recipe called for.

SewThankful Pumpkin Pie Ingredients:

  • Slightly less than 3/4 cup Granulated natural/unbleached Sugar (I remove about a tablespoon +/- from the 3/4 cup measure)
  • 1 teaspoon ground Cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • Scant 1/2 teaspoon Ground ginger
  • Scant 1/8 Teaspoon Ground cloves (if you don’t have a 1/8 teaspoon, just eyeball about half of a 1/4 teaspoon)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups pumpkin (or winter squash) puree (or one 15 oz. can of commercial pumpkin puree)
  • 1 12 fl oz Can Evaporated Milk
  • 1 unbaked 9-inch deep-dish pie shell (4-cup volume)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Whisk together the dry ingredients: sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Mix well, making sure all ingredients are evenly distributed.

In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs. Then add puree and sugar/spice mixture. Next, slowly stir in the evaporated milk. Stir thoroughly, making sure everything is well mixed and evenly distributed.

Pour pumpkin filling into pie shell.

Bake pie at 425 degrees F for 10 minutes.

Reduce temperature to 350 degrees F and continue to bake for an additional 40 – 55 minutes or so. Test for done-ness by inserting a knife straight down near the center of the pie. The pie is done when the knife comes out clean.

Cool on wire rack for at least 2 hours, then chill in the refrigerator at least another 2 hours to over night before serving.

Optional Serving Suggestion: Top slices with a dollop of your favorite whipped cream, ice cream or other topping.

She Do–> Hedou Tiny Bok Choy (Inspiration in the Garden)

Hedou Tiny Bok Choy – started from seed in March – harvested May 1st

I decided last year after we moved that this year I was going to put in a big garden. So in January I ordered my seeds after being totally smitten by a ton of seed catalogs. I tell you, ordering seeds is as addictive as ordering sewing patterns (for me!).

I love bok choy. I truly adore these tiny Hedous!! To give you an even better look at just how tiny here I am holding one:

As you probably know, bok choy is delicious in stir fry, salads and soups. These tiny Hedous are supremely delicious eaten whole (or maybe 2 bites) as a snack.

Not only are they delicious, the color and texture is exquisite too. It inspires me. How about you? Have you ever had Hedou Tiny Bok Choy?

SewThankful Crew Rail Runner Field Trip to Santa Fe

Jeff and I recently took the boys up to Santa Fe on the Rail Runner Express Train.  It was a wonderful afternoon and a delightful experience with the boys.  I’ve included some pictures below. If you click the image, it should open to a larger image in your internet browser window.

We thoroughly enjoyed riding on the upper level of the train, watching the New Mexico landscape whiz by.
Jared, age 13, contemplates the train ride and the day about to unfold…

 

Upon arriving at the Santa Fe Depot, we got off the train and walked to the Plaza.
Santa Fe – The Plaza
We walked through some shops and galleries, then decided to take a quick tour of the New Mexico History Museum where they allowed photography, but no flash.
Museum Courtyard Fountain
Museum Courtyard – Corner View
Here are just a few of the really spectacular pieces we enjoyed:

Junk Mail Fan Dress (Wrap Skirt) by Nancy Judd

This piece was made in 2000 from catalogs, solicitations and newspaper ads sewn on to a skirt made from canvas scraps.

Eco Flamenco Dress by Nancy Judd was made in 2011.

Cereal boxes painted with recycled paint became cascades of ruffles that contain over 5,000 eco-pledges–commitments of actions that people will take to help the environment. Ruffles cover a dress made from parachute scraps.

On the left – Escavada Black-on-White Jar, maker unknown. Circa 925- 1125 CE
On the right: Tularosa Black-on-white Jar, Circa 1100-1200 CE.

Both jars are clay and pigment.
Tile Chairs — Jared & Jacob enjoy a little break. Notice the kitty on the side of Jacob’s chair.

I hope you enjoyed sharing part of our excursion.

Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta 2011

My dear husband, Jeff, recently decided to take up road bicycling with me so we could experience some wonderful adventures together.  I have done a fair amount of bicycle riding, but I’ve never seen the balloons by bike.  So…

This morning we took  a nice 14 mile ride and here are a few pics:

Hot Air Balloon Deflating 

Balloons Galore

Jeff...and hot air balloons in the background

Jeff on his bike

It’s really amazing to see so many balloons in the air all at once. It still excites me after more than 15 years of seeing it and being around them.  I have to say that seeing them by bike was even more incredible than I thought it would be. It’s hard to explain the glorious, peaceful, graceful beauty…just makes me happy to be alive and celebrate life.

My plan is to get more close ups of the balloons this week.  Let’s all pray for continued good weather so the balloons can launch, everybody can stay safe and I can hopefully get some great pics to share.